Papal Indulgences/Indulgences for the dead

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Papal Indulgences/Indulgences for the Dead

 

Arguably the practice of granting Indulgences traces its roots to the earliest centuries of the Christian era. It is part of the elaborate and often complicated Roman Catholic system of penance. The Catholic Catechism describes it as, “a remission before God of the temporal punishment due to sins whose guilt has already been forgiven, which the faithful Christian who is duly disposed gains under certain prescribed conditions through the action of the Church which, as the minister of redemption, dispenses and applies with authority the treasury of the satisfactions of Christ and the saints” .

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The Grace of Godliness – Video Interview with Matthew Barrett

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The Grace of Godliness-Matthew Barrett from credomag.com on Vimeo.

In this new interview, Matthew Barrett talks about his most recent book, The Grace of Godliness: An Introduction to Doctrine and Piety in the Canons of Dort. Barrett is Assistant Professor of Christian Studies at California Baptist University (OPS) and executive editor of Credo Magazine. Michael A.G. Haykin has written the foreword to the book, and here are some of the book’s commendations as well:

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Vancouver Conference October 19-20, 2012

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Well  technically it is not in Vancouver. The site location is in a lovely little town called Chilliwack, British Columbia about a 40 minute drive in some of the most beautiful mountain scenery in God’s creation. On that weekend, we will be exploring  the topic of Revival. Unlike conferences in the past, our focus will cover slightly different ground of God’s providential working in history.
Two sessions will focus on what the Scriptures have to say about this amazing and spectacular out pouring of the Spirit of God. Mark Jones will focus on Acts 2, the first New Testament record of Revival and then followup with a session entitled Diligent Plodding. The periods of Revival, through dramatic and spectacular only encompass a small span of Church History. The Church still grows through the day to day hum drum practices of the local church.

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New Release from Joshua Press by David Herbert

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Joshua Press is pleased to announce its latest release:

The Faces of Origins
A historical survey of the underlying
assumptions from the early church
to the twenty-first century
By David Herbert
Contemporary scientists, such as Richard Dawkins, have loudly proclaimed that evolutionism is an undeniable fact. They seem oblivious to the historical reality that the naturalistic underlying assumptions of evolutionism mirror the supernatural ones of creationism. The Faces of Origins
demonstrates the historical interdependence of these two opposing religious systems in  posing answers to the question of the origin of the
universe and human life.

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The Enlightenmnet and the Philosophes by David Herbert

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“Sapere aude! ‘Have courage to use our own reason!’—that is the motto of enlightenment.”1 was written by Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) in an article, ‘What is Enlightenment!’ By focusing upon human reason or rationality, the illustrious German philosopher succinctly encapsulated the central theme of this pivotal period of history which still has an effect on the mindset of the twenty-first century—some four hundred years later!

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Religious Freedom: Historical Highlights & Patterns Part 3: Isaac Backus by Michael A.G. Haykin

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Roger Williams, as we saw in the previous post, had sounded a clear call for religious liberty in the mid-seventeenth century. But it was not until the following century that this call was increasingly heeded and heralded. Consider, for example, the Massachusetts Baptist Isaac Backus (1724–1806). Backus was convinced, in his words, that “religion must at all times be a matter between God and individuals.”[1] Or again, he could say, “true religion is a voluntary obedience unto God.”[2] According to Backus, each person is individually answerable to God, both as judge,[3] and, for the Christian, as master.[4] Hence, he asked his opponents, “since religion is ever a matter between God and individuals, how can any man become a member of a religious society without his own consent?”[5] A state church, therefore, cannot be a true church because it forces people to belong to it against their wills.[6]

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Religious Freedom: Historical Highlights & Patterns Part 2: Roger Williams by Michael A.G. Haykin

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In the previous post in this mini-series, we looked at Oliver Cromwell’s vision of religious toleration and ended with an amazing quote about Cromwell and Islam by the one-time Baptist Roger Williams (1603/4–1683). Williams had become a Puritan during his studies for the Anglican ministry at Cambridge (B.A., 1627). He and his family sailed to New England in late 1630, making landfall on February 5, 1631. During the voyage over, Williams had had the time to do an intensive study of New Testament church polity and he had come to the two central convictions: the Puritans ought to separate entirely from the state church in England and every individual should be free to follow his own convictions in religious matters, for, in his words, “forced worship stinks in the nostrils of God.”[1]

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Religious Freedom: Historical Highlights & Patterns Part 1: The Puritans and Oliver Cromwell by Michael Haykin

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In his recent study of the invasion of the Soviet Union by Nazi Germany in June of 1941, American historian John Lukacs notes that one of the most important reasons for remembering the past is the correction of misreadings of the historical record, since, as he says, “the pursuit of truth is often a struggle through a jungle of sentiments and twisted statements of “facts”.”[1] How true this is when it comes to the subject at hand, the history of religious freedom. It is often argued that religious freedom as a concept owes its origins to the eighteenth-century Enlightenment and its rejection of the religious dogmatism of the both Roman Catholicism and Protestantism. In point of fact, in the English-speaking world, it is the previous century that is critical in the development of the idea of religious toleration. And it is in the matrix of certain circles of seventeenth-century English Puritanism, where, far from being the Taliban-like regime of popular imagination, the idea that religious coercion by the state is fundamentally wrong was birthed.

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